The iPad is an evolutionary link, leading to a new species, a hypo-active computer

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    I got to play with an iPad during a business lunch yesterday.  I have to say that I was impressed. I’m still not going to run out and buy one–at least not right away.
    The iPad is a step on the evolution toward a new, simpler, less active,  species of computer system, one that follows the axiom of Keep It Simple Stupid. 
    Call it hypo-active computing (as opposed to today’s hyperactive over-featured systems)
    A hypo-active computer tablet can do what computers once promised to do, make life simpler.
    The hypo-active tablet will be the death blow to newspapers printed on paper.   Whether “newspapers” will die with the newsprint or whether there will be a renaissance will depend on how today’s corporate management adapt to a new world. (I’m not optimistic. If news media corporate management still don’t “get” the web, they’re certainly not going to understand tablet computing)
    It’s also an open question whether the iPad and Apple will survive  and win the evolutionary race as the new species of hypo-active tablet emerges.
    The iPad is not yet available north of the border, although lots of people lined up in Buffalo and Bellingham to get one last week.    My luncheon companion had a friend send an iPad up from the United States.
    (Apple has just announced it’s delaying the international launch of the iPad  due to high consumer demand in the United States. The Canadian iPad launch was originally rumoured to be about 10 days from now. )
    As a photographer, I fell in love with the Guardian’s photo of the day app. Crisp, gorgeous resolution and colour. 
    I checked out the teaser edition of the New York Times (a few top stories). But for the Times to work it should have a couple of more teaser editions, one for sports fans and one for the arts.
    I reread part of the Winnie the Pooh that Apple bundles with the iPad.  The colour illustrations appear much better than faded editions on a printed page.
    Google maps in satellite mode are much better than on my current home monitor.
    Those critics of the iPad who wanted a laptop with camera and phone are caught in old-style, hyperactive computer mode, although there will likely be a hyperactive version of the iPad offered to those users.
    I can see myself reading the morning news on a tablet device of some type, rather than leafing through the morning paper (and ignoring the hyperactive morning news shows on TV) .
    I would like to get my photography magazines on a tablet. Wouldn’t take up so much space in my office and might spare a few trees.
    As a hiker, I would love a GPS-enabled tablet device with not just Google maps and satellite image but full  topographic map capability (perhaps tied into those satellite images). The iPad is about the size and shape, and just a little heavier, than a plastic map case.  It would need a robust housing, but unlike maps (unless they’re  plasticized) it won’t dissolve in a heavy rainstorm.  A night and storm proof display system would be a big help. (Today’s hand-held GPS hiking devices are too small and the automobile GPS are not really suited for hiking)
   
    Yes, I would pay for all three of those applications.

    At this point, it looks like Apple is cramming too much into the iPad to be a true make life simple, hypo-active computer system.
   
    A good KISS hypo-active computer tablet should have
   

  •     Lots of memory (Moore’s law applies here, memory capacity will increase)
  •     Good display for text and graphics   
  •     Flexible and powerful connectivity, through Wifi and 3G  and USB.
  •     The ability to operate completely independent of  any wireless or wired communication system.  (In Canadian, terms you can take it to the cottage and read  Harry Potter on the deck overlooking the lake?
  •     Programming apps and features that enhance its simplicity. That means ease of use.  Programmers and software managers must have a Zen-like approach to the hypo-active. Give up your ego. Write simple programs that do basic things (remember the days of MS-DOS programs that did just that?)
  •     The user decides how the hypo-active computer works for them.  That means the person with the hypo-active tablet can read a book bought from any e-book store.   Watch a movie with an external Blu-Ray device plugged in to that USB port.

    A hypo-active tablet computer and higher level hyperactive tablets will mean the death of broadcast television entertainment once you can download and watch your favourite shows directly from the original producer.  
   
    It will also bring changes in broadcast television news, sports and specials   All the tablet would need would be a built in tuner and a USB HDTV antenna or connection to a mini satellite dish. For sports fans, it means watching the big game anytime, anywhere. 

For news,  it brings more uncertainty. No one could have foretold the changes that cable made to news.  

    If I can venture one prediction, a hypo-active tablet with TV capability will finally bring the end of the hyperactive always breaking breaking news nonsense.   Especially if a viewer has Twitter available on the same tablet, they’re going to know  that “breaking news” story happened five hours earlier.

    (Also might be time to consider selling your cable company stock unless it has other telecommunication arms)

    The key point in the evolution of a popular hypo-active tablet  is price.

     The iPad is too expensive.  With prices starting at $499 US for a Wi-Fi, connection, a 3G version  starting at $629 for the 16-gigabyte version up to $829 for one with 64 gigabytes of storage, the iPad is competing with the work horse, the laptop. Consumers, apart from Apple evangelists and early adopters don’t need both.
   
    Apple is pricing itself out of the key  market,  teenagers and college students.   Can teenagers and students and young  cubicle workers afford  afford a laptop (and at this point the iPad is not a substitute) plus an iPhone plus an iPod? The digital generation may love Apple products but the iPad, at the moment, may be one device too many.

    There are other rivals coming to the market soon, much cheaper rivals. The Canadian bookstore chain Indigo is pushing the Kobo reader, priced at  $149  (Kobo products are already available for the Blackberry and smart phones). There are reports of a $99 reader later this year.

    If  I can venture a guess, a hypo-active, keep it simple stupid, tablet computer that wins in the marketplace is not going to come from Apple or Amazon.   That computer will come from some small company in Asia: China, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan or India, where the demand  for cheap hardware is highest. If that company comes up with a hypo-active tablet computer in the $80 to $100 range, one that has ease of use, simple, minimal features but a powerful memory and display system, it will capture the market.

    That form of hypo-active computer will be the winner. It will be a compliment, not a substitute for a laptop or a smart phone.

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    Imagine this.   Breakfast time on a weekend.  You get your morning coffee or tea.   You  put your tablet on a little stand and read the morning wires and tweets. Since, it’s the weekend,  you’ve got time, you decide to call up that fancy omlette recipe you always wanted to try, so you take your tablet into the kitchen (something you really wouldn’t want to do with a laptop and your smart phone screen is too small), move your hypo-active tablet into the kitchen counter, call up the recipe and whip up that omlette.  Back at the dining room table, you then read through the feature section of the paper and finally call up a map for your afternoon outing.

    This scenario has been written about by futurists and tech writers for the past 30 years. Perhaps, now, it’s here. Perhaps. We’ll see.

    (Note in a tweet in response to my blog on books and apps, Cody Brown noted: “I wouldn’t imagine an iPad app/book being that different than a video game for the first gameboy-It’s bound to a delivery device.” Smart thinking on a slightly different track than where I’m going, but certainly prescient)